Postcard from Oslo, Norway, Vulkan 1

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At the once industry-heavy bank of the river Akerselva, From 2004 to 2014 Vulkan was transformed from a run-down industrial area to a new neighbourhood. In earlier times there were sawmills, copper hammer, bark stamps, cement factory, brickwork, veneer saw, and chair factory, as well as Oslo’s first widely available shower bath here. Vulkan is located on the west-side of Akerselva at Nedre Foss.

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With hotels, schools, Oslo’s first food hall (They offer a fresh food market with an exclusive stock of organic, local produce and game), office spaces, cultural venues, restaurants, and apartments, its like a small city within the city. There are also many events which take place here.

 

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Postcard from Oslo, Norway, Ingens gate

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Ingens gate (nobody`s street) A little laneway characterized by street art next to Akerselva.  This is a street that “does not exist”  no buildings have the address Ingens gate. You can find the street on road maps but it has a sort of unofficial status.  The name Ingens gate is unofficial to, its background is apparently that nobody wanted to take responsibility for maintenances and snow plowing. In 2005 the sign Ingens gate (Nobody’s street) was put up as a response to the lack of effort.

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Sundays all year round, a street marked with arts and crafts is arranged. On the weekends before Christmas, it is a Christmas market.

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Postcard from Oslo, Norway, Brannvakten

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Brannvakten was completed in 1856 in connection with the bazaars and was Oslo’s first fire station.  Previous more or less random premises had been used and with no permanent staff.

After the big city fire on April 14, 1858, better fire service was set up with a new fire corps of 35 men who moved in in the 1860s-

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The tower was used to dry the water hoses and was to low as a lookout point, so the fire corps had a 24 – hour lookout point from the cathedral tower.  The city’s inhabitants were alarmed with gunshots and ringing the church bells.  To communicate with the fire station they pointed a red flag, in the daytime, and a torch at night,  in the direction of the fire.

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In the 1920s with modern technology, telegraph, and phone, the lookout was no longer needed and closed down.

The building was Oslos main fire station until 1941. It now houses the Oslo cathedral parish priest`s office.

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